Background and purpose: Infectious mononucleosis (IM) caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism linking these pathologies is unclear. Different reports indicate the association of EBV, and recently Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), with MS. For a better understanding of the role of these pathogens, the host response induced by selected antigenic peptides in subjects with a history of IM that significantly increases the risk of MS was investigated. Methods: Both humoral and cell-mediated response against peptides able to induce a specific immune activation in MS patients deriving from lytic and latent EBV antigens BOLF1305-320, EBNA1400-413, from MAP MAP_402718-32, MAP_0106c121-132 and from human proteins IRF5424-434 and MBP85-98 in subjects with current and past IM were examined. Results: EBNA1 and MAP_0106c peptides were able to induce a humoral immune response in subjects with a history of clinical IM in an independent manner. Moreover, these peptides were capable of inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor α by CD14+ monocyte cells. Conclusion: Our results highlight that EBV and MAP may be involved independently in the same causal process leading to MS in subjects with a history of IM.

Immune response induced by Epstein-Barr virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis peptides in current and past infectious mononucleosis: a risk for multiple sclerosis? / Mameli, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Giordano; Cossu, D; G, Galleri; Manetti, Roberto; Babudieri, Sergio; Mura, Ms; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 1351-5101. - 23:1(2016), pp. 140-147. [10.1111/ene.12821]

Immune response induced by Epstein-Barr virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis peptides in current and past infectious mononucleosis: a risk for multiple sclerosis?

MAMELI, Giuseppe;MADEDDU, Giordano;Cossu, D;MANETTI, Roberto;BABUDIERI, Sergio;SECHI, Leonardo Antonio
2016

Abstract

Background and purpose: Infectious mononucleosis (IM) caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism linking these pathologies is unclear. Different reports indicate the association of EBV, and recently Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), with MS. For a better understanding of the role of these pathogens, the host response induced by selected antigenic peptides in subjects with a history of IM that significantly increases the risk of MS was investigated. Methods: Both humoral and cell-mediated response against peptides able to induce a specific immune activation in MS patients deriving from lytic and latent EBV antigens BOLF1305-320, EBNA1400-413, from MAP MAP_402718-32, MAP_0106c121-132 and from human proteins IRF5424-434 and MBP85-98 in subjects with current and past IM were examined. Results: EBNA1 and MAP_0106c peptides were able to induce a humoral immune response in subjects with a history of clinical IM in an independent manner. Moreover, these peptides were capable of inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor α by CD14+ monocyte cells. Conclusion: Our results highlight that EBV and MAP may be involved independently in the same causal process leading to MS in subjects with a history of IM.
Immune response induced by Epstein-Barr virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis peptides in current and past infectious mononucleosis: a risk for multiple sclerosis? / Mameli, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Giordano; Cossu, D; G, Galleri; Manetti, Roberto; Babudieri, Sergio; Mura, Ms; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 1351-5101. - 23:1(2016), pp. 140-147. [10.1111/ene.12821]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/59910
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 10
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact