In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e., who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g., color, shape, or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12–14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature.

Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills / Uccula, Arcangelo Francesco; Enna, M; Mulatti, C.. - In: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-1078. - 5:(2014). [10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00833]

Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

UCCULA, Arcangelo Francesco;
2014

Abstract

In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e., who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g., color, shape, or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12–14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature.
Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills / Uccula, Arcangelo Francesco; Enna, M; Mulatti, C.. - In: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1664-1078. - 5:(2014). [10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00833]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/80776
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