BACKGROUND & AIM: The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease in cirrhosis remains controversial. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of H pylori infection and portal hypertension gastropathy in the prevalence of active peptic ulcer among dyspeptic patients with compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis. METHODS: Patients undergoing upper endoscopy with compensated HCV-related cirrhosis were enrolled. Child-Pugh's score was determined at the entry. Variceal size was measured endoscopically and the severity of portal hypertensive gastropathy was graded. H pylori infection status was determined by urea breath testing and/or histology. RESULTS: A total of 178 patients positive for HCV (A and B Child-Pugh's score) were prospectively included. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 43%. An active peptic ulcer was found in 14 patients (8%) and was significantly more common among those with H pylori infection (16% versus 2% in H pylori uninfected patients, odds ratio: 8.0). No association was observed between H pylori infection and variceal size, or hypertensive gastropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with compensated cirrhosis and H pylori infection showed higher risk of developing a peptic ulcer. Clinical relevance of this result would be that dyspeptic patients with HCV-related cirrhosis may benefit from preventive screening and eradication of H pylori, especially those with features of insufficient hemostasis.

Active peptic ulcer disease in patients with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis: the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy / Dore, Maria Pina; Mura, D; Deledda, S; Maragkoudakis, E; Pironti, A; Realdi, G.. - In: THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY. - ISSN 0835-7900. - (2004).

Active peptic ulcer disease in patients with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis: the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy

DORE, Maria Pina;
2004

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIM: The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease in cirrhosis remains controversial. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of H pylori infection and portal hypertension gastropathy in the prevalence of active peptic ulcer among dyspeptic patients with compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis. METHODS: Patients undergoing upper endoscopy with compensated HCV-related cirrhosis were enrolled. Child-Pugh's score was determined at the entry. Variceal size was measured endoscopically and the severity of portal hypertensive gastropathy was graded. H pylori infection status was determined by urea breath testing and/or histology. RESULTS: A total of 178 patients positive for HCV (A and B Child-Pugh's score) were prospectively included. The prevalence of H pylori infection was 43%. An active peptic ulcer was found in 14 patients (8%) and was significantly more common among those with H pylori infection (16% versus 2% in H pylori uninfected patients, odds ratio: 8.0). No association was observed between H pylori infection and variceal size, or hypertensive gastropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with compensated cirrhosis and H pylori infection showed higher risk of developing a peptic ulcer. Clinical relevance of this result would be that dyspeptic patients with HCV-related cirrhosis may benefit from preventive screening and eradication of H pylori, especially those with features of insufficient hemostasis.
Active peptic ulcer disease in patients with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis: the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy / Dore, Maria Pina; Mura, D; Deledda, S; Maragkoudakis, E; Pironti, A; Realdi, G.. - In: THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY. - ISSN 0835-7900. - (2004).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/79351
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