OBJECTIVE: To study brainstem function in Parkinson's Disease (PD) at different stages, through a battery of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and compare the results with scores on clinical scales assessing the presence of symptoms linked to brainstem involvement. METHODS: Cervical, masseter and ocular VEMPs were recorded in patients with early PD (n=14, disease duration 1.42±0.7years), advanced PD (n=19, disease duration 7.26±2.9years) and in 27 age-matched controls. In PD, the following clinical scales were administered: Mini-BESTest, REM sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBD-SQ), PD Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: Rate of VEMPs alterations was higher (p<0.001) in PD than controls, but similar within PD groups. However, early and advanced PD showed a different pattern of abnormalities (p=0.02), being latency delay prevalent in the former and absence in the latter. VEMP impairment correlated directly with RBD-SQ scores in both PD cohorts and inversely with Mini-BESTest scores in advanced PD. CONCLUSIONS: VEMPs displayed progressive severity of alterations at different stages of PD, with remarkable correlations with presence of postural instability and RBD. SIGNIFICANCE: The combined use of VEMPs may provide interesting insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of PD at the earliest and prodromal stage of the disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

Paired neurophysiological and clinical study of the brainstem at different stages of Parkinson's Disease / De Natale, Er; Ginatempo, F; Paulus, Ks; Manca, A; Mercante, B; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Agnetti, V; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca. - In: CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1388-2457. - 126:15(2015), pp. 1871-1878. [10.1016/j.clinph.2014.12.017]

Paired neurophysiological and clinical study of the brainstem at different stages of Parkinson's Disease

Ginatempo F;Manca A;Mercante B;PES, Giovanni Mario;DERIU, Franca
2015-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study brainstem function in Parkinson's Disease (PD) at different stages, through a battery of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and compare the results with scores on clinical scales assessing the presence of symptoms linked to brainstem involvement. METHODS: Cervical, masseter and ocular VEMPs were recorded in patients with early PD (n=14, disease duration 1.42±0.7years), advanced PD (n=19, disease duration 7.26±2.9years) and in 27 age-matched controls. In PD, the following clinical scales were administered: Mini-BESTest, REM sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBD-SQ), PD Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: Rate of VEMPs alterations was higher (p<0.001) in PD than controls, but similar within PD groups. However, early and advanced PD showed a different pattern of abnormalities (p=0.02), being latency delay prevalent in the former and absence in the latter. VEMP impairment correlated directly with RBD-SQ scores in both PD cohorts and inversely with Mini-BESTest scores in advanced PD. CONCLUSIONS: VEMPs displayed progressive severity of alterations at different stages of PD, with remarkable correlations with presence of postural instability and RBD. SIGNIFICANCE: The combined use of VEMPs may provide interesting insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of PD at the earliest and prodromal stage of the disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
2015
Paired neurophysiological and clinical study of the brainstem at different stages of Parkinson's Disease / De Natale, Er; Ginatempo, F; Paulus, Ks; Manca, A; Mercante, B; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Agnetti, V; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca. - In: CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1388-2457. - 126:15(2015), pp. 1871-1878. [10.1016/j.clinph.2014.12.017]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/46108
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