Purpose: High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is commonly used post-extubation in intensive care (ICU). Patients' comfort during HFNC is affected by flow rate. The study aims to describe the relationship between preextubation inspiratory flow requirements and the post-extubation flow rates on HFNC that maximises patient's comfort.Methods: This was an observational, retrospective study conducted in a university-affiliated ICU. We included patients extubated following successful spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). During the SBT we recorded variables including inspiratory flow. Patients who passed the SBT were extubated onto HFNC. HFNC was titrated from 20 L/min and increased in steps of 10 L/min, up to 60 L/min. At each step, patient's level of comfort was assessed. Fraction of inspired oxygen was titrated to maintain oxygen saturation 92-97%.Results: Nineteen participants were enrolled in the study. There was a significant positive correlation between mean inspiratory flow pre-extubation and the flow setting on HFNC which achieved the best comfort post-extubation (r(2) 0.88; p < 0.001). Overall, greatest comfort was observed for HFNC flows between 30 and 40 L/min but with individual variability.Conclusion: Measuring mean inspiratory flow during an SBT allows for individualised setting of HFNC flow rate immediately post-extubation and achieves the greatest comfort and interface tolerance. (C) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Initial setting of high-flow nasal oxygen post extubation based on mean inspiratory flow during a spontaneous breathing trial / Butt, Sophia; Pistidda, Laura; Floris, Leda; Liperi, Corrado; Vasques, Francesco; Glover, Guy; Barrett, Nicholas A; Sanderson, Barnaby; Grasso, Salvatore; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Camporotaa, Luigi. - In: JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE. - ISSN 0883-9441. - 63:(2021). [10.1016/j.jcrc.2020.12.022]

Initial setting of high-flow nasal oxygen post extubation based on mean inspiratory flow during a spontaneous breathing trial

Pistidda, Laura;Floris, Leda;Liperi, Corrado;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is commonly used post-extubation in intensive care (ICU). Patients' comfort during HFNC is affected by flow rate. The study aims to describe the relationship between preextubation inspiratory flow requirements and the post-extubation flow rates on HFNC that maximises patient's comfort.Methods: This was an observational, retrospective study conducted in a university-affiliated ICU. We included patients extubated following successful spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). During the SBT we recorded variables including inspiratory flow. Patients who passed the SBT were extubated onto HFNC. HFNC was titrated from 20 L/min and increased in steps of 10 L/min, up to 60 L/min. At each step, patient's level of comfort was assessed. Fraction of inspired oxygen was titrated to maintain oxygen saturation 92-97%.Results: Nineteen participants were enrolled in the study. There was a significant positive correlation between mean inspiratory flow pre-extubation and the flow setting on HFNC which achieved the best comfort post-extubation (r(2) 0.88; p < 0.001). Overall, greatest comfort was observed for HFNC flows between 30 and 40 L/min but with individual variability.Conclusion: Measuring mean inspiratory flow during an SBT allows for individualised setting of HFNC flow rate immediately post-extubation and achieves the greatest comfort and interface tolerance. (C) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2021
Initial setting of high-flow nasal oxygen post extubation based on mean inspiratory flow during a spontaneous breathing trial / Butt, Sophia; Pistidda, Laura; Floris, Leda; Liperi, Corrado; Vasques, Francesco; Glover, Guy; Barrett, Nicholas A; Sanderson, Barnaby; Grasso, Salvatore; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Camporotaa, Luigi. - In: JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE. - ISSN 0883-9441. - 63:(2021). [10.1016/j.jcrc.2020.12.022]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/328113
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