Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have mapped thousands of genetic variants associated with complex disease risk and regulating quantitative traits, thus exploiting an unprecedented high-resolution genetic characterization of the human genome. A small fraction (3.7%) of the identified associations is located in untranslated regions (UTRs), and the molecular mechanism has been elucidated for few of them. Genetic variations at UTRs may modify regulatory elements affecting the interaction of the UTRs with proteins and microRNAs. The overall functional consequences include modulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription, secondary structure, stability, localization, translation, and access to regulators like microRNAs (miRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Alterations of these regulatory mechanisms are known to modify molecular pathways and cellular processes, potentially leading to disease processes. Here, we analyze some examples of genetic risk variants mapping in the UTR regulatory elements. We describe a recently identified genetic variant localized in the 3'UTR of the TNFSF13B gene, associated with autoimmunity risk and responsible of an increased stability and translation of TNFSF13B mRNA. We discuss how the correct use and interpretation of public GWAS repositories could lead to a better understanding of etiopathogenetic mechanisms and the generation of robust biological hypothesis as starting point for further functional studies.This article is categorized under:RNA Structure and Dynamics > RNA Structure, Dynamics and ChemistryRNA Evolution and Genomics > Computational Analyses of RNARNA in Disease and Development > RNA in Disease

Genetic variants in mRNA untranslated regions / Steri, Maristella; Idda, Maria Laura; Whalen, Michael B.; Orrù, Valeria. - In: WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS. RNA. - ISSN 1757-7004. - 9:4(2018). [10.1002/wrna.1474]

Genetic variants in mRNA untranslated regions

Idda, Maria Laura;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have mapped thousands of genetic variants associated with complex disease risk and regulating quantitative traits, thus exploiting an unprecedented high-resolution genetic characterization of the human genome. A small fraction (3.7%) of the identified associations is located in untranslated regions (UTRs), and the molecular mechanism has been elucidated for few of them. Genetic variations at UTRs may modify regulatory elements affecting the interaction of the UTRs with proteins and microRNAs. The overall functional consequences include modulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription, secondary structure, stability, localization, translation, and access to regulators like microRNAs (miRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Alterations of these regulatory mechanisms are known to modify molecular pathways and cellular processes, potentially leading to disease processes. Here, we analyze some examples of genetic risk variants mapping in the UTR regulatory elements. We describe a recently identified genetic variant localized in the 3'UTR of the TNFSF13B gene, associated with autoimmunity risk and responsible of an increased stability and translation of TNFSF13B mRNA. We discuss how the correct use and interpretation of public GWAS repositories could lead to a better understanding of etiopathogenetic mechanisms and the generation of robust biological hypothesis as starting point for further functional studies.This article is categorized under:RNA Structure and Dynamics > RNA Structure, Dynamics and ChemistryRNA Evolution and Genomics > Computational Analyses of RNARNA in Disease and Development > RNA in Disease
2018
Genetic variants in mRNA untranslated regions / Steri, Maristella; Idda, Maria Laura; Whalen, Michael B.; Orrù, Valeria. - In: WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS. RNA. - ISSN 1757-7004. - 9:4(2018). [10.1002/wrna.1474]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/328056
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