Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) are two common diseases in elderly populations. Despite the effectiveness of oral anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic stroke prevention, intracranial hemorrhage represents the most serious complication of these therapies. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is one of the main risk factors for spontaneous intracranial bleeding, and this risk is highly increased by age and concomitant antithrombotic therapies. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy can be silent for years and then manifest with clinical features simulating TIA (TIA-mimics) or stroke in AF patients, pushing clinicians to rapidly start VKAs or DOACs, thus increasing the risk of intracranial bleeding if the diagnosis of CAA was unknown. Because the cerebral amyloid angiopathy is easily diagnosed with non-contrast MRI, suspecting the disease can avoid catastrophic complications. In this review, we will provide physicians managing anticoagulant therapies with key tips to familiarize themselves with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the possible clinical presentations and on the diagnostic criteria.

When Atrial Fibrillation Meets Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Current Evidence and Strategies / Merella, P.; Casu, G.; Chessa, P.; Atzori, E.; Bandino, S.; Deiana, G.. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 12:24(2023). [10.3390/jcm12247704]

When Atrial Fibrillation Meets Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Current Evidence and Strategies

Casu G.;Chessa P.;Atzori E.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) are two common diseases in elderly populations. Despite the effectiveness of oral anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic stroke prevention, intracranial hemorrhage represents the most serious complication of these therapies. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is one of the main risk factors for spontaneous intracranial bleeding, and this risk is highly increased by age and concomitant antithrombotic therapies. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy can be silent for years and then manifest with clinical features simulating TIA (TIA-mimics) or stroke in AF patients, pushing clinicians to rapidly start VKAs or DOACs, thus increasing the risk of intracranial bleeding if the diagnosis of CAA was unknown. Because the cerebral amyloid angiopathy is easily diagnosed with non-contrast MRI, suspecting the disease can avoid catastrophic complications. In this review, we will provide physicians managing anticoagulant therapies with key tips to familiarize themselves with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the possible clinical presentations and on the diagnostic criteria.
2023
When Atrial Fibrillation Meets Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Current Evidence and Strategies / Merella, P.; Casu, G.; Chessa, P.; Atzori, E.; Bandino, S.; Deiana, G.. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 12:24(2023). [10.3390/jcm12247704]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/323750
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