Psychological counselling represents sensitive frontline services for the detection and treatment of early signs of distress in students. This study aims to assess psychological distress in medical students at the beginning of their academic career and the access rate to a counselling service during medical school. Predictors of access to the service and the effectiveness of the service were also explored. Distress and emotional dysregulation were measured in three consecutive cohorts of first-year students (n = 385, 53% female). Students accessing the counselling service at any time during the 6 years of medical school all completed the same baseline measurements and a pre/post assessment of the intervention. Nearly one-third of first-year students reported levels of distress above the clinical cutoff. The access rate to the counselling service was 13.9%. Only 21% of the students with clinical levels of distress contacted the counselling service. Living alone and having high distress at the beginning of the medical course were the main predictors of access to the service. Students reported a significant reduction of distress and dysregulation after counselling interventions. More efforts are needed to develop effective tools for identifying and tracking medical students in psychological hardship and to increase their willingness to attend the counselling services.

Pattern of access, early predictors of use, and treatment effectiveness of a psychological counselling service for medical students: an Italian longitudinal study / Bani, M; Ardenghi, S; Zorzi, F; Russo, S; Corrias, D; Strepparava, Mg. - In: COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY QUARTERLY. - ISSN 0951-5070. - (2023), pp. 1-15. [10.1080/09515070.2023.2204420]

Pattern of access, early predictors of use, and treatment effectiveness of a psychological counselling service for medical students: an Italian longitudinal study

Zorzi, F;Russo, S;Strepparava, MG
2023-01-01

Abstract

Psychological counselling represents sensitive frontline services for the detection and treatment of early signs of distress in students. This study aims to assess psychological distress in medical students at the beginning of their academic career and the access rate to a counselling service during medical school. Predictors of access to the service and the effectiveness of the service were also explored. Distress and emotional dysregulation were measured in three consecutive cohorts of first-year students (n = 385, 53% female). Students accessing the counselling service at any time during the 6 years of medical school all completed the same baseline measurements and a pre/post assessment of the intervention. Nearly one-third of first-year students reported levels of distress above the clinical cutoff. The access rate to the counselling service was 13.9%. Only 21% of the students with clinical levels of distress contacted the counselling service. Living alone and having high distress at the beginning of the medical course were the main predictors of access to the service. Students reported a significant reduction of distress and dysregulation after counselling interventions. More efforts are needed to develop effective tools for identifying and tracking medical students in psychological hardship and to increase their willingness to attend the counselling services.
2023
Pattern of access, early predictors of use, and treatment effectiveness of a psychological counselling service for medical students: an Italian longitudinal study / Bani, M; Ardenghi, S; Zorzi, F; Russo, S; Corrias, D; Strepparava, Mg. - In: COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY QUARTERLY. - ISSN 0951-5070. - (2023), pp. 1-15. [10.1080/09515070.2023.2204420]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/309289
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