Recent research suggests that transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) may positively affect cognitive function. However, no clear-cut evidence is available yet, since the majority of it derives from clinical studies, and the few data on healthy subjects show inconsistent results. In this study, we report the effects of short-term TNS on event-related potentials (ERP) recorded during the administration of a simple visual oddball task and a paired-click paradigm, both considered useful for studying brain information processing functions. Thirty-two healthy subjects underwent EEG recording before and after 20 min of sham- or real-TNS, delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. The amplitude and latency of P200 and P300 waves in the simple visual oddball task and P50, N100 and P200 waves in the paired-click paradigm were measured before and after treatment. Our results show that short-term TNS did not alter any of the ERP parameters measured, suggesting that in healthy subjects, short-term TNS may not affect brain processes involved in cognitive functions such as pre-attentional processes, early allocation of attention and immediate memory. The perspective of having an effective, non-pharmacological, non-invasive, and safe treatment option for cognitive decline is particularly appealing; therefore, more research on the positive effects on cognition of TNS is definitely needed.

Short-term transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation does not affect visual oddball task and paired-click paradigm ERP responses in healthy volunteers / Mercante, Beniamina; Enrico, Paolo; Ginatempo, Francesca; Loi, Nicola; Deriu, Franca. - In: EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0014-4819. - (2022). [10.1007/s00221-022-06525-1]

Short-term transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation does not affect visual oddball task and paired-click paradigm ERP responses in healthy volunteers

Mercante, Beniamina;Enrico, Paolo;Ginatempo, Francesca;Loi, Nicola;Deriu, Franca
2022-01-01

Abstract

Recent research suggests that transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) may positively affect cognitive function. However, no clear-cut evidence is available yet, since the majority of it derives from clinical studies, and the few data on healthy subjects show inconsistent results. In this study, we report the effects of short-term TNS on event-related potentials (ERP) recorded during the administration of a simple visual oddball task and a paired-click paradigm, both considered useful for studying brain information processing functions. Thirty-two healthy subjects underwent EEG recording before and after 20 min of sham- or real-TNS, delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. The amplitude and latency of P200 and P300 waves in the simple visual oddball task and P50, N100 and P200 waves in the paired-click paradigm were measured before and after treatment. Our results show that short-term TNS did not alter any of the ERP parameters measured, suggesting that in healthy subjects, short-term TNS may not affect brain processes involved in cognitive functions such as pre-attentional processes, early allocation of attention and immediate memory. The perspective of having an effective, non-pharmacological, non-invasive, and safe treatment option for cognitive decline is particularly appealing; therefore, more research on the positive effects on cognition of TNS is definitely needed.
Short-term transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation does not affect visual oddball task and paired-click paradigm ERP responses in healthy volunteers / Mercante, Beniamina; Enrico, Paolo; Ginatempo, Francesca; Loi, Nicola; Deriu, Franca. - In: EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH. - ISSN 0014-4819. - (2022). [10.1007/s00221-022-06525-1]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/300165
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact