Aim: To combine the current scientific literature evidence and elucidate the differences of lead (Pb) bioaccumulation in human tissues by comparing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and healthy controls. Methods: We systematically searched for case-control studies on the association of Pb levels with ALS, in human cells, tissues, and body fluids (nervous tissue, muscle, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, skin appendages). Then, we performed a meta-analysis for all the tissues in which at least five case-control studies were available: whole blood (9 studies), serum/plasma (5 studies), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (6 studies). Differences between cases and controls were evaluated using standardized mean difference, and combined estimates were derived using random effect maximum likelihood (REML) meta-analyses. Results: Among 1734 records, we identified 46 full-text studies, of which 14 case-control studies met the meta-analysis inclusion criteria. We found higher Pb levels in ALS cases than controls in blood (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 1.01; p = 0.003), plasma/serum (SMD = 0.27; 95% CI - 0.16, 0.70; p = 0.26), and CSF (SMD = 0.53; 95% CI - 0.09, 1.15; p = 0.09). Conclusions: This work provides further evidence of the association between Pb bioaccumulation and ALS in body fluids. The lack of association studies in solid tissues did not allow a robust meta-analysis. Future prospective studies are needed to clarify the causality in the association of Pb bioaccumulation with ALS.

Human tissue lead (Pb) levels and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies / Farace, C; Fiorito, G; Pisano, A; Etzi, F; Sabalic, A; Fenu, G; Asara, Y; Solinas, G; Madeddu, R.. - In: JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES. - ISSN 0022-510X. - (2022). [10.1007/s10072-022-06237-y]

Human tissue lead (Pb) levels and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

Farace C;Fiorito G;Pisano A
;
Etzi F;Sabalic A;Fenu G;Asara Y;Solinas G;Madeddu R.
2022

Abstract

Aim: To combine the current scientific literature evidence and elucidate the differences of lead (Pb) bioaccumulation in human tissues by comparing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and healthy controls. Methods: We systematically searched for case-control studies on the association of Pb levels with ALS, in human cells, tissues, and body fluids (nervous tissue, muscle, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, skin appendages). Then, we performed a meta-analysis for all the tissues in which at least five case-control studies were available: whole blood (9 studies), serum/plasma (5 studies), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (6 studies). Differences between cases and controls were evaluated using standardized mean difference, and combined estimates were derived using random effect maximum likelihood (REML) meta-analyses. Results: Among 1734 records, we identified 46 full-text studies, of which 14 case-control studies met the meta-analysis inclusion criteria. We found higher Pb levels in ALS cases than controls in blood (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 1.01; p = 0.003), plasma/serum (SMD = 0.27; 95% CI - 0.16, 0.70; p = 0.26), and CSF (SMD = 0.53; 95% CI - 0.09, 1.15; p = 0.09). Conclusions: This work provides further evidence of the association between Pb bioaccumulation and ALS in body fluids. The lack of association studies in solid tissues did not allow a robust meta-analysis. Future prospective studies are needed to clarify the causality in the association of Pb bioaccumulation with ALS.
Human tissue lead (Pb) levels and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies / Farace, C; Fiorito, G; Pisano, A; Etzi, F; Sabalic, A; Fenu, G; Asara, Y; Solinas, G; Madeddu, R.. - In: JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES. - ISSN 0022-510X. - (2022). [10.1007/s10072-022-06237-y]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/294283
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