Helicobacter pylori infection has been reported to be positively associated with hypertension, although with conflicting results. In this study, the relationship between H. pylori infection and hypertension, as well as atherosclerotic carotid lesions, was analyzed. Methods. Clinical records of patients referred to undergo upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy were retrieved. Information regarding the presence of H. pylori infection with atrophy/metaplasia/dysplasia (interpreted as a long‐lasting infection), and current or past H. pylori infection was collected, as well as demographic variables, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, presence of carotid lesions, and current treatment, and analyzed by multivariable regression models. Results. A total of 7152 clinical records from patients older than 30 years (63.4% women) were available for the study. Hypertension was present in 2039 (28.5%) patients and the risk was significantly increased in those with long‐lasting H. pylori infection after adjusting for age decades, sex, BMI, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and dyslipidemia (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02‒1.35). In addition, the long‐lasting H. pylori infection was an independent risk for carotid plaques (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.14‒4.09). Conclusions. Our retrospective study demonstrated that long‐lasting H. pylori infection is an independent risk factor for hypertension and the presence of carotid lesions after adjusting for potential confounders, although further validation our findings is needed from prospective studies.

Increased Risk to Develop Hypertension and Carotid Plaques in Patients with Long-Lasting Helicobacter pylori Gastritis / Dore, Maria Pina; Saba, Pier Sergio; Tomassini, Giulia; Niolu, Caterina; Monaco, Marco; Pes, Giovanni Mario. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 11:9(2022), p. 2282. [10.3390/jcm11092282]

Increased Risk to Develop Hypertension and Carotid Plaques in Patients with Long-Lasting Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

Dore, Maria Pina
Conceptualization
;
Saba, Pier Sergio
Data Curation
;
Tomassini, Giulia
Investigation
;
Niolu, Caterina
Investigation
;
Pes, Giovanni Mario
Formal Analysis
2022-01-01

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori infection has been reported to be positively associated with hypertension, although with conflicting results. In this study, the relationship between H. pylori infection and hypertension, as well as atherosclerotic carotid lesions, was analyzed. Methods. Clinical records of patients referred to undergo upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy were retrieved. Information regarding the presence of H. pylori infection with atrophy/metaplasia/dysplasia (interpreted as a long‐lasting infection), and current or past H. pylori infection was collected, as well as demographic variables, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, presence of carotid lesions, and current treatment, and analyzed by multivariable regression models. Results. A total of 7152 clinical records from patients older than 30 years (63.4% women) were available for the study. Hypertension was present in 2039 (28.5%) patients and the risk was significantly increased in those with long‐lasting H. pylori infection after adjusting for age decades, sex, BMI, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and dyslipidemia (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02‒1.35). In addition, the long‐lasting H. pylori infection was an independent risk for carotid plaques (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.14‒4.09). Conclusions. Our retrospective study demonstrated that long‐lasting H. pylori infection is an independent risk factor for hypertension and the presence of carotid lesions after adjusting for potential confounders, although further validation our findings is needed from prospective studies.
2022
Increased Risk to Develop Hypertension and Carotid Plaques in Patients with Long-Lasting Helicobacter pylori Gastritis / Dore, Maria Pina; Saba, Pier Sergio; Tomassini, Giulia; Niolu, Caterina; Monaco, Marco; Pes, Giovanni Mario. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 2077-0383. - 11:9(2022), p. 2282. [10.3390/jcm11092282]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/283670
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