Cystic echinococcosis (CE), a zoonotic disease caused by the species complex of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.), is endemic in Middle East and the Mediterranean basin, where pastoral activity is widespread. Despite the chronic endemicity of the disease in Lebanon and neighbouring countries, recent data are scant. The objectives of this survey were to evaluate the current epidemiology of CE in Lebanon, investigate the prevalence and determine the infecting genotypes in locally raised sheep and goats. A multidimensional approach combining post-mortem inspection of slaughtered animals and molecular diagnosis of the parasite was conducted to this end. From 2018 to 2020, 62.9% of the sheep and 20.9% of the goats were found positive for CE. The presence of hydatids varied between organs, showing higher prevalence in the liver of sheep vs the lungs of goats, however, a higher fertility rate of hydatid cyst was observed in lungs for both animals. Molecular diagnosis based on partial mitochondrial cox1 gene (795 bp) showed that the majority of isolates were identified as E. granulosus sensu stricto (98.7%) and only one isolate from goat was identified as Echinococcus canadensis (genotype G7; 1.3%). Echinococcus granulosus s.s. population among the sheep and goats was represented by 22 haplotypes having very little genetic differentiation and relatively moderate haplotype diversity. Population demographics explored through neutrality indices suggested expanding population within the intermediate hosts. These results document the high prevalence of CE in the livestock of Lebanon and reveal for the first time the presence of three different genotypes G1, G3 and G7.

Cystic echinococcosis in sheep and goats of Lebanon / Joanny, G.; Mehmood, N.; Dessi, G.; Tamponi, C.; Nonnis, F.; Hosri, C.; Saarma, U.; Varcasia, A.; Scala, A.. - In: PARASITOLOGY. - ISSN 0031-1820. - 148:7(2021), pp. 871-878. [10.1017/S0031182021000494]

Cystic echinococcosis in sheep and goats of Lebanon

Tamponi C.;Nonnis F.;Varcasia A.;Scala A.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE), a zoonotic disease caused by the species complex of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.), is endemic in Middle East and the Mediterranean basin, where pastoral activity is widespread. Despite the chronic endemicity of the disease in Lebanon and neighbouring countries, recent data are scant. The objectives of this survey were to evaluate the current epidemiology of CE in Lebanon, investigate the prevalence and determine the infecting genotypes in locally raised sheep and goats. A multidimensional approach combining post-mortem inspection of slaughtered animals and molecular diagnosis of the parasite was conducted to this end. From 2018 to 2020, 62.9% of the sheep and 20.9% of the goats were found positive for CE. The presence of hydatids varied between organs, showing higher prevalence in the liver of sheep vs the lungs of goats, however, a higher fertility rate of hydatid cyst was observed in lungs for both animals. Molecular diagnosis based on partial mitochondrial cox1 gene (795 bp) showed that the majority of isolates were identified as E. granulosus sensu stricto (98.7%) and only one isolate from goat was identified as Echinococcus canadensis (genotype G7; 1.3%). Echinococcus granulosus s.s. population among the sheep and goats was represented by 22 haplotypes having very little genetic differentiation and relatively moderate haplotype diversity. Population demographics explored through neutrality indices suggested expanding population within the intermediate hosts. These results document the high prevalence of CE in the livestock of Lebanon and reveal for the first time the presence of three different genotypes G1, G3 and G7.
2021
Cystic echinococcosis in sheep and goats of Lebanon / Joanny, G.; Mehmood, N.; Dessi, G.; Tamponi, C.; Nonnis, F.; Hosri, C.; Saarma, U.; Varcasia, A.; Scala, A.. - In: PARASITOLOGY. - ISSN 0031-1820. - 148:7(2021), pp. 871-878. [10.1017/S0031182021000494]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/256447
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