The role of age in perception and production of facial expressions is still unclear. Therefore, this work compared, in aged and young subjects, the effects of passive viewing of faces expressing different emotions on perceptive brain regions, such as occipital and temporal cortical areas and on the primary motor cortex (M1) innervating face muscles. Seventeen young (24.41±0.71 years) and seventeen aged (63.82±0.99 years) subjects underwent recording of event-related potentials (ERP), of motor potentials evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of face M1 in the depressor anguli oris muscle and reaction time assessment. In both groups, the P100 and N170 waves, as well as short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) were probed in face M1 after 300 ms from the presentation of images reporting faces expressing happy, sad and neutral emotions. ERP data evidenced a major involvement of the right hemisphere in perceptual processing of faces, regardless of age. Compared with young subjects, the aged group showed a delayed N170 wave and a smaller P100 wave following the view of sad but not happy or neutral expressions, along with less accuracy and longer reaction times for recognition of the emotion expressed by faces. Aged subjects presented less SICI than young subjects, but facial expressions of happiness increased the excitability of face M1 with no differences between groups. In conclusion, data suggest that encoding of sad face expressions is impaired in the aged compared to the young group, while perception of happiness and its excitatory effects on face M1 remains preserved.

Faces emotional expressions: from perceptive to motor areas in aged and young subjects / Loi, Nicola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Manca, Andrea; Melis, Francesco; Deriu, Franca. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3077. - 126:Oct 6(2021), pp. 1642-1652. [10.1152/jn.00328.2021]

Faces emotional expressions: from perceptive to motor areas in aged and young subjects

Loi, Nicola;Ginatempo, Francesca;Manca, Andrea;Melis, Francesco;Deriu, Franca
2021

Abstract

The role of age in perception and production of facial expressions is still unclear. Therefore, this work compared, in aged and young subjects, the effects of passive viewing of faces expressing different emotions on perceptive brain regions, such as occipital and temporal cortical areas and on the primary motor cortex (M1) innervating face muscles. Seventeen young (24.41±0.71 years) and seventeen aged (63.82±0.99 years) subjects underwent recording of event-related potentials (ERP), of motor potentials evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of face M1 in the depressor anguli oris muscle and reaction time assessment. In both groups, the P100 and N170 waves, as well as short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) were probed in face M1 after 300 ms from the presentation of images reporting faces expressing happy, sad and neutral emotions. ERP data evidenced a major involvement of the right hemisphere in perceptual processing of faces, regardless of age. Compared with young subjects, the aged group showed a delayed N170 wave and a smaller P100 wave following the view of sad but not happy or neutral expressions, along with less accuracy and longer reaction times for recognition of the emotion expressed by faces. Aged subjects presented less SICI than young subjects, but facial expressions of happiness increased the excitability of face M1 with no differences between groups. In conclusion, data suggest that encoding of sad face expressions is impaired in the aged compared to the young group, while perception of happiness and its excitatory effects on face M1 remains preserved.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/248856
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact