Objective: To compare the short-term effects of adaptive support ventilation (ASV), an advanced closed-loop mode, with conventional volume or pressurecontrol ventilation in patients passively ventilated for acute respiratory failure. Design: Prospective crossover interventional multicenter trial. Setting: Six European academic intensive care units. Patients: Eighty-eight patients in three groups: patients with no obvious lung disease (n = 22), restrictive lung disease (n = 36) or obstructive lung disease (n = 30). Interventions: After measurements on conventional ventilation (CV) as set by the patients' clinicians, each patient was switched to ASV set to obtain the same minute ventilation as during CV (isoMV condition). If this resulted in a change in PaCO2, the minute ventilation setting of ASV was readjusted to achieve the same PaCO2 as in CV (isoCO2 condition). Measurements and results: Compared with CV, PaCO2 during ASV in isoMV condition and minute ventilation during ASV in isoCO2 condition were slightly lower, with lower inspiratory work/minute performed by the ventilator (p<0.01). Oxygenation and hemodynamics were unchanged. During ASV, respiratory rate was slightly lower and tidal volume (Vt) slightly greater (p<0.01), especially in obstructed patients. During ASV there were different ventilatory patterns in the three groups, with lower Vt in patients with restrictive disease and prolonged expiratory time in obstructed patients, thus mimicking the clinicians' choices for setting CV. In three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the resulting Vt was unacceptably high. Conclusions: Comparison between ASV and CV resulted either in similarities or in minor differences. Except for excessive Vt in a few obstructed patients, all differences were in favor of ASV. © 2010 jointly held by Springer and ESICM.

Adaptive support ventilation versus conventional ventilation for total ventilatory support in acute respiratory failure / Iotti, G. A.; Polito, A.; Belliato, M.; Pasero, D.; Beduneau, G.; Wysocki, M.; Brunner, J. X.; Braschi, A.; Brochard, L.; Mancebo, J.; Ranieri, V. M.; Richard, J. -C. M.; Arthur S., Slutsky. - In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE. - ISSN 0342-4642. - 36:8(2010), pp. 1371-1379. [10.1007/s00134-010-1917-2]

Adaptive support ventilation versus conventional ventilation for total ventilatory support in acute respiratory failure

Pasero D.;
2010

Abstract

Objective: To compare the short-term effects of adaptive support ventilation (ASV), an advanced closed-loop mode, with conventional volume or pressurecontrol ventilation in patients passively ventilated for acute respiratory failure. Design: Prospective crossover interventional multicenter trial. Setting: Six European academic intensive care units. Patients: Eighty-eight patients in three groups: patients with no obvious lung disease (n = 22), restrictive lung disease (n = 36) or obstructive lung disease (n = 30). Interventions: After measurements on conventional ventilation (CV) as set by the patients' clinicians, each patient was switched to ASV set to obtain the same minute ventilation as during CV (isoMV condition). If this resulted in a change in PaCO2, the minute ventilation setting of ASV was readjusted to achieve the same PaCO2 as in CV (isoCO2 condition). Measurements and results: Compared with CV, PaCO2 during ASV in isoMV condition and minute ventilation during ASV in isoCO2 condition were slightly lower, with lower inspiratory work/minute performed by the ventilator (p<0.01). Oxygenation and hemodynamics were unchanged. During ASV, respiratory rate was slightly lower and tidal volume (Vt) slightly greater (p<0.01), especially in obstructed patients. During ASV there were different ventilatory patterns in the three groups, with lower Vt in patients with restrictive disease and prolonged expiratory time in obstructed patients, thus mimicking the clinicians' choices for setting CV. In three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the resulting Vt was unacceptably high. Conclusions: Comparison between ASV and CV resulted either in similarities or in minor differences. Except for excessive Vt in a few obstructed patients, all differences were in favor of ASV. © 2010 jointly held by Springer and ESICM.
Adaptive support ventilation versus conventional ventilation for total ventilatory support in acute respiratory failure / Iotti, G. A.; Polito, A.; Belliato, M.; Pasero, D.; Beduneau, G.; Wysocki, M.; Brunner, J. X.; Braschi, A.; Brochard, L.; Mancebo, J.; Ranieri, V. M.; Richard, J. -C. M.; Arthur S., Slutsky. - In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE. - ISSN 0342-4642. - 36:8(2010), pp. 1371-1379. [10.1007/s00134-010-1917-2]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/244535
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 27
social impact