The analysis of licking microstructure provides measures which might be interpreted in terms of psychological constructs, such as pleasure and motivation, relevant for the interpretation of the effects of antidepressant drugs. The aim of this study was to characterise the effect of the prototypical antidepressant imipramine on the microstructure of licking for a 10% sucrose solution. In particular, ten 30-min sessions were performed in the course of a daily 21 day treatment with imipramine – 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/die administered intraperitoneally. To interpret drug effects in relation to the presumed concentration of imipramine and its active metabolite desipramine, the experimental sessions were performed in an alternate order either 1-h or 24-h after imipramine administration. In the sessions performed 1-h after drug administration, the results showed a dose-dependent reduction of sucrose ingestion, accounted for by a reduction of the licking burst number. Moreover, reduced intra-burst lick rate and increased latency to lick were observed with the highest doses. Imipramine effect in the sessions performed 24-h after drug administration was similar but less pronounced. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the reduction of sucrose ingestion might be due to reduced motivation and/or to a potentiation of satiety signals. These effects appear to be related, at least in part, to brain drug levels at testing time, and do not seem related to the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant therapeutic effect. However, these results might be relevant in explaining the effects of imipramine in models of drug-seeking and on body weight.

Microstructure analysis of sucrose ingestion in the course of chronic treatment with imipramine / D'Aquila, P. S.; Galistu, A.. - In: PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 0031-9384. - 224:(2020). [10.1016/j.physbeh.2020.113032]

Microstructure analysis of sucrose ingestion in the course of chronic treatment with imipramine.

D'Aquila P. S.
;
Galistu A.
2020

Abstract

The analysis of licking microstructure provides measures which might be interpreted in terms of psychological constructs, such as pleasure and motivation, relevant for the interpretation of the effects of antidepressant drugs. The aim of this study was to characterise the effect of the prototypical antidepressant imipramine on the microstructure of licking for a 10% sucrose solution. In particular, ten 30-min sessions were performed in the course of a daily 21 day treatment with imipramine – 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/die administered intraperitoneally. To interpret drug effects in relation to the presumed concentration of imipramine and its active metabolite desipramine, the experimental sessions were performed in an alternate order either 1-h or 24-h after imipramine administration. In the sessions performed 1-h after drug administration, the results showed a dose-dependent reduction of sucrose ingestion, accounted for by a reduction of the licking burst number. Moreover, reduced intra-burst lick rate and increased latency to lick were observed with the highest doses. Imipramine effect in the sessions performed 24-h after drug administration was similar but less pronounced. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the reduction of sucrose ingestion might be due to reduced motivation and/or to a potentiation of satiety signals. These effects appear to be related, at least in part, to brain drug levels at testing time, and do not seem related to the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant therapeutic effect. However, these results might be relevant in explaining the effects of imipramine in models of drug-seeking and on body weight.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/234980
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