Purpose Music listening while running enhances physiological and psychological features, resulting in a more enjoyable experience. The possible influence of music on ground reaction forces (GRF) during running, however, is unknown. Considering the ‘distracting’ role of music on runner’s attention, we hypothesized that music would cover foot impacts against the ground. This study verified such hypothesis by testing the effects of different music volumes while running at different velocities. Methods Fifty fit volunteers (F:M = 22:8; 23 ± 2 years) performed 2-min running stints over 3 random conditions (80-dB, 85-dB music; ‘no music’), at 3 velocities (8, 10, 12 km/h). Participants ran on a sensorized treadmill that recorded GRF during all experiments. Results Listening to 85-dB music resulted in greater GRF at 8 (p = 0.0005) and 10 km/h (p = 0.04) but not 12 km/h (p = 0.35) and not with 80-dB volume. Gender-based analyses revealed significant Condition × gender interactions only for 85-dB music vs. ‘no music’. Bonferroni-adjusted comparisons revealed significant music-induced increases in GRF only in men at 8 km/h (+ 4.1 kg/cm2, p < 0.0005; women: + 0.8 kg/cm2, p = 0.47) and 10 km/h (+ 3.3 kg/cm2, p = 0.004; women: + 0.8 kg/cm2, p = 0.51) but not at 12 km/h. Conclusion In active men, listening to loud music while running results in increased GRF, whereas no effect was observed in women. The lack of music effect in women may be related to structural factors, such as larger hip width-to-femoral length ratio, possibly resulting in different loading patterns. The present preliminary findings introduce high-volume music listening as a new potential risk factor for injury in young runners.

Listening to music while running alters ground reaction forces: a study of acute exposure to varying speed and loudness levels in young women and men / Manca, Andrea; Cugusi, Lucia; Pomidori, Luca; Felisatti, Michele; Altavilla, Giorgio; Zocca, Eleonora; Zocca, Martina; Bussu, Francesco; Dvir, Zeevi; Deriu, Franca. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1439-6319. - 120:6(2020), pp. 1391-1401. [10.1007/s00421-020-04371-z]

Listening to music while running alters ground reaction forces: a study of acute exposure to varying speed and loudness levels in young women and men

Manca, Andrea;Cugusi, Lucia;Bussu, Francesco;Deriu, Franca
2020

Abstract

Purpose Music listening while running enhances physiological and psychological features, resulting in a more enjoyable experience. The possible influence of music on ground reaction forces (GRF) during running, however, is unknown. Considering the ‘distracting’ role of music on runner’s attention, we hypothesized that music would cover foot impacts against the ground. This study verified such hypothesis by testing the effects of different music volumes while running at different velocities. Methods Fifty fit volunteers (F:M = 22:8; 23 ± 2 years) performed 2-min running stints over 3 random conditions (80-dB, 85-dB music; ‘no music’), at 3 velocities (8, 10, 12 km/h). Participants ran on a sensorized treadmill that recorded GRF during all experiments. Results Listening to 85-dB music resulted in greater GRF at 8 (p = 0.0005) and 10 km/h (p = 0.04) but not 12 km/h (p = 0.35) and not with 80-dB volume. Gender-based analyses revealed significant Condition × gender interactions only for 85-dB music vs. ‘no music’. Bonferroni-adjusted comparisons revealed significant music-induced increases in GRF only in men at 8 km/h (+ 4.1 kg/cm2, p < 0.0005; women: + 0.8 kg/cm2, p = 0.47) and 10 km/h (+ 3.3 kg/cm2, p = 0.004; women: + 0.8 kg/cm2, p = 0.51) but not at 12 km/h. Conclusion In active men, listening to loud music while running results in increased GRF, whereas no effect was observed in women. The lack of music effect in women may be related to structural factors, such as larger hip width-to-femoral length ratio, possibly resulting in different loading patterns. The present preliminary findings introduce high-volume music listening as a new potential risk factor for injury in young runners.
Listening to music while running alters ground reaction forces: a study of acute exposure to varying speed and loudness levels in young women and men / Manca, Andrea; Cugusi, Lucia; Pomidori, Luca; Felisatti, Michele; Altavilla, Giorgio; Zocca, Eleonora; Zocca, Martina; Bussu, Francesco; Dvir, Zeevi; Deriu, Franca. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1439-6319. - 120:6(2020), pp. 1391-1401. [10.1007/s00421-020-04371-z]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/232478
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