Two experiments explored the relations between prejudice (suppression), (cognitive) ambivalence and negative behavioural tendencies towards out-groups. The current work argues that expressing out-group ambivalence based on cognitive, but not affective, information is a strategy to justify one's otherwise suppressed prejudice, which may ultimately "cover" the discriminatory nature of out-group-directed negative behavioural tendencies. Two experiments show that (1) participants evaluating the out-group in a normative context inducing prejudice suppression are more likely to self-report ambivalent beliefs rather than ambivalent emotions concerning the out-group as compared with participants whose prejudice expression is induced and (2) high-prejudice participants compared with low-prejudice participants are more prone to out-group-directed negative behavioural tendencies when these latter are self-reported after the expression of ambivalent beliefs but not ambivalent emotions concerning the out-group, and when the expression of their prejudicial evaluations is salient but not when it is not. In light of the extent to which ambivalent attitudes towards out-groups are often seamlessly integrated into public discourse, the implications of the findings are discussed not only for intergroup research but also at the societal level.

Ambivalence, prejudice and negative behavioural tendencies towards out-groups: the moderating role of attitude basis / Costarelli, Sandro; Gerłowska, Justyna. - In: COGNITION & EMOTION. - ISSN 0269-9931. - 29:5/6(2015), pp. 852-866. [10.1080/02699931.2014.950196]

Ambivalence, prejudice and negative behavioural tendencies towards out-groups: the moderating role of attitude basis

COSTARELLI, Sandro
;
2015-01-01

Abstract

Two experiments explored the relations between prejudice (suppression), (cognitive) ambivalence and negative behavioural tendencies towards out-groups. The current work argues that expressing out-group ambivalence based on cognitive, but not affective, information is a strategy to justify one's otherwise suppressed prejudice, which may ultimately "cover" the discriminatory nature of out-group-directed negative behavioural tendencies. Two experiments show that (1) participants evaluating the out-group in a normative context inducing prejudice suppression are more likely to self-report ambivalent beliefs rather than ambivalent emotions concerning the out-group as compared with participants whose prejudice expression is induced and (2) high-prejudice participants compared with low-prejudice participants are more prone to out-group-directed negative behavioural tendencies when these latter are self-reported after the expression of ambivalent beliefs but not ambivalent emotions concerning the out-group, and when the expression of their prejudicial evaluations is salient but not when it is not. In light of the extent to which ambivalent attitudes towards out-groups are often seamlessly integrated into public discourse, the implications of the findings are discussed not only for intergroup research but also at the societal level.
Ambivalence, prejudice and negative behavioural tendencies towards out-groups: the moderating role of attitude basis / Costarelli, Sandro; Gerłowska, Justyna. - In: COGNITION & EMOTION. - ISSN 0269-9931. - 29:5/6(2015), pp. 852-866. [10.1080/02699931.2014.950196]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/202698
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