Barley is the main raw material for beer production but must first be converted into malt before its use in brewing. Unmalted cereals, such as corn, rice, wheat, and sorghum, are often used as adjuncts in some countries. Corn products are traditionally used as an adjunct in the USA and Europe because it provides extract at a lower cost (a more cost effective form of carbohydrate) than is available from malted barley. Corn adjuncts are readily available, and provide other positive effects such as color adjustment, fuller flavor, etc. The addition of corn products as a raw material in an all-malt beer recipe is considered a beer adulteration. The aim of this research was the evaluation of the fatty acids pattern as a method for ascertaining the presence of corn grits as an adjunct in beer, and to determine if its presence is checkable in labeled all-malt beers. A correlation between the different pattern of fatty acids in beer with and without corn grits could be an index to evaluate the presence of solid corn adjunct in beer. Lipid content and fatty acids profile were evaluated in malt and corn, in stated all-malt beer and in stated beer with added corn grits. The results obtained in this preliminary study show a potential correlation between fatty acids of beer lipids and different raw materials in the recipe.

Preparative supercritical fluid extraction for quality control in beer industry / Bravi, E.; Perretti, G.; Montanari, Luigi; Fantozzi, P.. - (2006), pp. 29-34. ((Intervento presentato al convegno - tenutosi a Ischia, Naples, Italy nel 28-31 May 2006.

Preparative supercritical fluid extraction for quality control in beer industry

MONTANARI, Luigi;
2006

Abstract

Barley is the main raw material for beer production but must first be converted into malt before its use in brewing. Unmalted cereals, such as corn, rice, wheat, and sorghum, are often used as adjuncts in some countries. Corn products are traditionally used as an adjunct in the USA and Europe because it provides extract at a lower cost (a more cost effective form of carbohydrate) than is available from malted barley. Corn adjuncts are readily available, and provide other positive effects such as color adjustment, fuller flavor, etc. The addition of corn products as a raw material in an all-malt beer recipe is considered a beer adulteration. The aim of this research was the evaluation of the fatty acids pattern as a method for ascertaining the presence of corn grits as an adjunct in beer, and to determine if its presence is checkable in labeled all-malt beers. A correlation between the different pattern of fatty acids in beer with and without corn grits could be an index to evaluate the presence of solid corn adjunct in beer. Lipid content and fatty acids profile were evaluated in malt and corn, in stated all-malt beer and in stated beer with added corn grits. The results obtained in this preliminary study show a potential correlation between fatty acids of beer lipids and different raw materials in the recipe.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/50419
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