Recent research has unveiled intriguing insights suggesting that the body's immune system may be implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) development. Studies have observed disparities in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers between PD patients and healthy individuals. This finding underscores the potential influence of immune system dysfunction in the genesis of this condition. A dysfunctional immune system can serve as a primary catalyst for systemic inflammation in the body, which may contribute to the emergence of various brain disorders. The identification of several genes associated with PD, as well as their connection to neuroinflammation, raises the likelihood of disease susceptibility. Moreover, advancing age and mitochondrial dysfunction can weaken the immune system, potentially implicating them in the onset of the disease, particularly among older individuals. Compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier could facilitate the immune system's access to brain tissue. This exposure may lead to encounters with native antigens or infections, potentially triggering an autoimmune response. Furthermore, there is mounting evidence supporting the notion that gut dysbiosis might represent an initial trigger for brain inflammation, ultimately promoting neurodegeneration. In this comprehensive review, we will delve into the numerous hypotheses surrounding the role of both innate and adaptive immunity in PD.

The Role of Immune Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease Development / Cossu, Davide; Hatano, Taku; Hattori, Nobutaka. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 24:23(2023). [10.3390/ijms242316766]

The Role of Immune Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease Development

Cossu, Davide
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Recent research has unveiled intriguing insights suggesting that the body's immune system may be implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) development. Studies have observed disparities in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers between PD patients and healthy individuals. This finding underscores the potential influence of immune system dysfunction in the genesis of this condition. A dysfunctional immune system can serve as a primary catalyst for systemic inflammation in the body, which may contribute to the emergence of various brain disorders. The identification of several genes associated with PD, as well as their connection to neuroinflammation, raises the likelihood of disease susceptibility. Moreover, advancing age and mitochondrial dysfunction can weaken the immune system, potentially implicating them in the onset of the disease, particularly among older individuals. Compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier could facilitate the immune system's access to brain tissue. This exposure may lead to encounters with native antigens or infections, potentially triggering an autoimmune response. Furthermore, there is mounting evidence supporting the notion that gut dysbiosis might represent an initial trigger for brain inflammation, ultimately promoting neurodegeneration. In this comprehensive review, we will delve into the numerous hypotheses surrounding the role of both innate and adaptive immunity in PD.
2023
The Role of Immune Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease Development / Cossu, Davide; Hatano, Taku; Hattori, Nobutaka. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 24:23(2023). [10.3390/ijms242316766]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/321329
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