The recovery of historic parks and gardens is highly regarded by botanists and architects; less attention however is reserved to farms, which have a considerable significance for the history of agriculture. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) has been one of the protagonists of nineteenth century Italian history, giving a significant contribution to the unification of Italy - of which this year marks the 150th anniversary. During the last decades of his life, from 1860, Garibaldi retired on the island of Caprera (Sardinia) where he built a state-of-the-art farm for the period. The farm, including buildings and land, has become a national monument in 1907, the agricultural aspects, however, have been given a lesser degree of attention compared to the historical ones. From the agricultural journals of Garibaldi and the testimonies of various authors it was possible to reconstruct the history of the introduction of several species of which remain currently a number of woody plants. Garibaldi’s interest for plants was not merely economic; his library displays many titles that clearly show his passion for science and his attention to both cultivated and wild plants. It is no coincidence that Gennari (1870), while studying the flora of Caprera, was his guest. Canevazzi (1866), Aventi (1869), Falconi (1902) and later Curatulo (1926) were the first to provide a thorough description of the corporate structure and an list of the vegetables and fruit most commonly grown (pear, apple, citrus, melocotogno, screw), along with some rare species for the times in Sardinia, such as black sorghum, Ipomoea batatas, the date palm, pistachio and ash manna. Garibaldi introduced several species of ornamental and forestry interest such as Paraserianthes lophantha (Willd) Nielsen, Acacia farnesiana L., Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn., Pinus pinea L., Pinus halepensis L., Populus nigra L., Cupressus sempervirens L., Quercus robur L. The farm represents still a significant source of data from which is possible to reconstruct its original layout and deserves to be valued in accordance with the purposes indicated below: 1) to increase the value of the natural, scenic and cultural area; 2) to encourage use of the area by visitors, tourists and schoolchildren who are constantly visiting the Compendium, qualified in terms of cultural history; 3) to highlight the role of Garibaldi in the transformation of the natural landscape of the island into an agricultural landscape, the types of crops grown and the functionality of the farm; 4) to highlight the importance of the role played by Garibaldi in the exploitation of the natural resources of the Island of Caprera; 5) to reconstruct as accurately as possible the original structure of the farm; 6) to protect the monumental trees planted by Garibaldi for their historical and cultural significance.

The farm of Garibaldi: Botanic restoration and rehabilitation in the museum area of Garibaldi in Caprera island (Sardinia). Proceedings 5th International Congress on “Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin” Vol. IV Biological diversity-Museum projects & benefits, 61-65 / Camarda, Ignazio; Brunu, L; Carta, L; Vacca, G.. - IV:(2012), pp. 61-65. ((Intervento presentato al convegno International Congress on “Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin tenutosi a Istanbul nel 2012.

The farm of Garibaldi: Botanic restoration and rehabilitation in the museum area of Garibaldi in Caprera island (Sardinia). Proceedings 5th International Congress on “Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin” Vol. IV Biological diversity-Museum projects & benefits, 61-65.

CAMARDA, Ignazio;
2012-01-01

Abstract

The recovery of historic parks and gardens is highly regarded by botanists and architects; less attention however is reserved to farms, which have a considerable significance for the history of agriculture. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) has been one of the protagonists of nineteenth century Italian history, giving a significant contribution to the unification of Italy - of which this year marks the 150th anniversary. During the last decades of his life, from 1860, Garibaldi retired on the island of Caprera (Sardinia) where he built a state-of-the-art farm for the period. The farm, including buildings and land, has become a national monument in 1907, the agricultural aspects, however, have been given a lesser degree of attention compared to the historical ones. From the agricultural journals of Garibaldi and the testimonies of various authors it was possible to reconstruct the history of the introduction of several species of which remain currently a number of woody plants. Garibaldi’s interest for plants was not merely economic; his library displays many titles that clearly show his passion for science and his attention to both cultivated and wild plants. It is no coincidence that Gennari (1870), while studying the flora of Caprera, was his guest. Canevazzi (1866), Aventi (1869), Falconi (1902) and later Curatulo (1926) were the first to provide a thorough description of the corporate structure and an list of the vegetables and fruit most commonly grown (pear, apple, citrus, melocotogno, screw), along with some rare species for the times in Sardinia, such as black sorghum, Ipomoea batatas, the date palm, pistachio and ash manna. Garibaldi introduced several species of ornamental and forestry interest such as Paraserianthes lophantha (Willd) Nielsen, Acacia farnesiana L., Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn., Pinus pinea L., Pinus halepensis L., Populus nigra L., Cupressus sempervirens L., Quercus robur L. The farm represents still a significant source of data from which is possible to reconstruct its original layout and deserves to be valued in accordance with the purposes indicated below: 1) to increase the value of the natural, scenic and cultural area; 2) to encourage use of the area by visitors, tourists and schoolchildren who are constantly visiting the Compendium, qualified in terms of cultural history; 3) to highlight the role of Garibaldi in the transformation of the natural landscape of the island into an agricultural landscape, the types of crops grown and the functionality of the farm; 4) to highlight the importance of the role played by Garibaldi in the exploitation of the natural resources of the Island of Caprera; 5) to reconstruct as accurately as possible the original structure of the farm; 6) to protect the monumental trees planted by Garibaldi for their historical and cultural significance.
978-88-905639-8-0
The farm of Garibaldi: Botanic restoration and rehabilitation in the museum area of Garibaldi in Caprera island (Sardinia). Proceedings 5th International Congress on “Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin” Vol. IV Biological diversity-Museum projects & benefits, 61-65 / Camarda, Ignazio; Brunu, L; Carta, L; Vacca, G.. - IV:(2012), pp. 61-65. ((Intervento presentato al convegno International Congress on “Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin tenutosi a Istanbul nel 2012.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/77161
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