By analysing songs whose lyrics seem to clash and respond to each other, this article will first look at the differences between the themes addressed by female rappers and those addressed by male rappers, particularly in the Marseilles rap scene, which has so far been less studied than the Parisian scene. We will then look at how the music of these female rappers has been received on the Web, and analyse the support or rejection expressed in response to the rise of women in what is considered to be a fundamentally male-dominated field. In this instance, we will focus on the hate speech triggered in online comments on digital platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and the madamerap.com website by the release of two songs by a group of eight female rappers from Marseilles, whose aim was to respond to the album by a collective of fifty Marseilles rappers. Through both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of online comments, a major form of native digital discourse, omnipresent on the web and now considered to be emblematic spaces of verbal violence (Paveau 2017: 35), we will see that these female rappers, whose legitimacy as artists is being debated, are often the targets of gender-based discrimination.

"J’espère qu’elles cuisinent mieux qu’elles rappent » : des rappeuses victimes de discours haineux en ligne" / Devilla, L.; Federico, S.. - (2024), pp. 1-18.

"J’espère qu’elles cuisinent mieux qu’elles rappent » : des rappeuses victimes de discours haineux en ligne"

Devilla, L.
;
Federico, S.
2024-01-01

Abstract

By analysing songs whose lyrics seem to clash and respond to each other, this article will first look at the differences between the themes addressed by female rappers and those addressed by male rappers, particularly in the Marseilles rap scene, which has so far been less studied than the Parisian scene. We will then look at how the music of these female rappers has been received on the Web, and analyse the support or rejection expressed in response to the rise of women in what is considered to be a fundamentally male-dominated field. In this instance, we will focus on the hate speech triggered in online comments on digital platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and the madamerap.com website by the release of two songs by a group of eight female rappers from Marseilles, whose aim was to respond to the album by a collective of fifty Marseilles rappers. Through both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of online comments, a major form of native digital discourse, omnipresent on the web and now considered to be emblematic spaces of verbal violence (Paveau 2017: 35), we will see that these female rappers, whose legitimacy as artists is being debated, are often the targets of gender-based discrimination.
2024
"J’espère qu’elles cuisinent mieux qu’elles rappent » : des rappeuses victimes de discours haineux en ligne" / Devilla, L.; Federico, S.. - (2024), pp. 1-18.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/330090
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