The annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting (CNS) began in 1990 as a small workshop called Analysis and Modeling of Neural Systems. The goal of the workshop was to explore the boundary between neuroscience and computation. Riding on the success of several seminal papers, physicists had made "Neural Networks" fashionable, and soon the quantitative methods used in these abstract model networks started permeating the methods and ideas of experimental neuroscientists. Although experimental neurophysiological approaches provided many advances, it became increasingly evident that mathematical and computational techniques would be required to achieve a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of neural system function. “Computational Neuroscience” emerged to complement experimental neurophysiology. In 2002, the non-profit organization, Organization for Computational Neuroscience (OCNS) was formed. OCNS has now become the first professional society serving the global computational neuroscience community. OCNS as a society lives at the interface where experimental neuroscience meets theoretical, statistical and computer-simulation analyses, with the hope of turning large collections of experimental results into a principled understanding of nervous systems. It also supports the development of new engineering, computational and informatics techniques for data collection, analyses and management.

High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels / Solinas, Sergio; Masoli, Stefano; Subramaniyam, Sathyaa. - (2014), pp. 1-7. [10.1007/978-1-4614-7320-6_230-1]

High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

Solinas, Sergio
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2014

Abstract

The annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting (CNS) began in 1990 as a small workshop called Analysis and Modeling of Neural Systems. The goal of the workshop was to explore the boundary between neuroscience and computation. Riding on the success of several seminal papers, physicists had made "Neural Networks" fashionable, and soon the quantitative methods used in these abstract model networks started permeating the methods and ideas of experimental neuroscientists. Although experimental neurophysiological approaches provided many advances, it became increasingly evident that mathematical and computational techniques would be required to achieve a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of neural system function. “Computational Neuroscience” emerged to complement experimental neurophysiology. In 2002, the non-profit organization, Organization for Computational Neuroscience (OCNS) was formed. OCNS has now become the first professional society serving the global computational neuroscience community. OCNS as a society lives at the interface where experimental neuroscience meets theoretical, statistical and computer-simulation analyses, with the hope of turning large collections of experimental results into a principled understanding of nervous systems. It also supports the development of new engineering, computational and informatics techniques for data collection, analyses and management.
978-1-4614-7320-6
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/254222
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