Landscape fragmentation (LF), i.e., the process where large habitat patches become smaller and more isolated, has been studied recently by a variety of scholars. Most of the time, LF negatively affects wild fauna and flora and depends mainly on human activities, such as deforestation, urbanization, and transport and mobility infrastructures. Spatial, landscape, and transport planning are typical instruments for designing defragmentation measures (such as ecological networks, green and blue infrastructures, etc.) in the perspective of the reduction of LF in rural, periurban, and urban contexts. As LF is a product of the interaction between human activity and the environment, the design of sustainable counteractions relays on the development of proper environmental assessment procedures, including environmental impact assessment (EIA), strategic environmental assessment (SEA), and appropriate assessment (AA) concerning Natura 2000 sites. The integration of environmental assessment procedures since the early stages of the planning processes is key to the minimization of the effects connected to the increase of LF in a given area. This Special Issue focuses on LF and sustainable environmental assessment. Authors are invited to submit original research articles concerning innovative approaches for (though not exclusively): defining and quantifying LF, integrating LF in planning contexts, and designing and addressing defragmentation measures. Essays should clarify the interplay between LF analysis and planning and environmental assessment processes.

Landscape Fragmentation and Sustainable Environmental Assessment / Ledda, Antonio; De Montis, Andrea. - In: SUSTAINABILITY. - ISSN 2071-1050. - (2021).

Landscape Fragmentation and Sustainable Environmental Assessment

Antonio Ledda
Conceptualization
;
Andrea De Montis
Conceptualization
2021

Abstract

Landscape fragmentation (LF), i.e., the process where large habitat patches become smaller and more isolated, has been studied recently by a variety of scholars. Most of the time, LF negatively affects wild fauna and flora and depends mainly on human activities, such as deforestation, urbanization, and transport and mobility infrastructures. Spatial, landscape, and transport planning are typical instruments for designing defragmentation measures (such as ecological networks, green and blue infrastructures, etc.) in the perspective of the reduction of LF in rural, periurban, and urban contexts. As LF is a product of the interaction between human activity and the environment, the design of sustainable counteractions relays on the development of proper environmental assessment procedures, including environmental impact assessment (EIA), strategic environmental assessment (SEA), and appropriate assessment (AA) concerning Natura 2000 sites. The integration of environmental assessment procedures since the early stages of the planning processes is key to the minimization of the effects connected to the increase of LF in a given area. This Special Issue focuses on LF and sustainable environmental assessment. Authors are invited to submit original research articles concerning innovative approaches for (though not exclusively): defining and quantifying LF, integrating LF in planning contexts, and designing and addressing defragmentation measures. Essays should clarify the interplay between LF analysis and planning and environmental assessment processes.
Landscape Fragmentation and Sustainable Environmental Assessment / Ledda, Antonio; De Montis, Andrea. - In: SUSTAINABILITY. - ISSN 2071-1050. - (2021).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11388/231511
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