Starting in the Middle Bronze Age, Nuragic settlements developed autonomously or, more frequently, in association with Nuragic towers. These were dispersed and unorganized juxtapositions of circular and, more rarely, rectangular structures.The houses were delimited by a wall from 0.80 to 1.50 m high. Their roof was made from wood or more rarely from flat stones. The frames consisted of beams resting on the tops of walls, while in the centre of the floor there was a hearth or a millstone. During the Middle Bronze Age (BM 2-3), the aggregation process of these circular and rectangular structures began, leading to the development of centripetal houses.During the Late Bronze Age, buildings from the preceding period still exist, represented by structures with or without stone bases, but also by semi-underground structures. Drystone circular structures were the most frequent, but there were also rare cases of quadrangular or sub trapezoidal ones. Hut villages grew the most during the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, with the adaptation and revision of the circular shape in new syntax solutions. In the Early Iron Age, central courtyard buildings appeared. These are characterized by a predominantly circular unitary body in which the rooms were arranged in a radial pattern around the courtyard. Later, but still in the Early Iron Age, the trend would be the construction of a greater number of small rooms, strictly centred on the courtyard. The function of the spaces can be evaluated in a few cases, but more frequently for the Final Bronze and Early Iron Age. We thus observe the presence of hearths and distinct spaces used for food preservation and storage, as well as kitchens. Variations in the architectural forms and the aggregation of living spaces can be interpreted as an expression of fundamental changes in the society. In houses with a single circular or rectangular chamber, the interior dimensions seem to correspond to the residential space for basic families, probably as part of kinship-based society. Houses with several non-connected rooms seem to have been occupied by larger groups, while the houses with a central courtyard and rooms arranged radially, seem to indicate a greater intention to distinguish family groups from the rest of the village population.

L’organisation de l’espace dans les villages de la pèriode nuragique / Depalmas, Anna. - (2018), pp. 431-442.

L’organisation de l’espace dans les villages de la pèriode nuragique

Depalmas Anna
2018

Abstract

Starting in the Middle Bronze Age, Nuragic settlements developed autonomously or, more frequently, in association with Nuragic towers. These were dispersed and unorganized juxtapositions of circular and, more rarely, rectangular structures.The houses were delimited by a wall from 0.80 to 1.50 m high. Their roof was made from wood or more rarely from flat stones. The frames consisted of beams resting on the tops of walls, while in the centre of the floor there was a hearth or a millstone. During the Middle Bronze Age (BM 2-3), the aggregation process of these circular and rectangular structures began, leading to the development of centripetal houses.During the Late Bronze Age, buildings from the preceding period still exist, represented by structures with or without stone bases, but also by semi-underground structures. Drystone circular structures were the most frequent, but there were also rare cases of quadrangular or sub trapezoidal ones. Hut villages grew the most during the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, with the adaptation and revision of the circular shape in new syntax solutions. In the Early Iron Age, central courtyard buildings appeared. These are characterized by a predominantly circular unitary body in which the rooms were arranged in a radial pattern around the courtyard. Later, but still in the Early Iron Age, the trend would be the construction of a greater number of small rooms, strictly centred on the courtyard. The function of the spaces can be evaluated in a few cases, but more frequently for the Final Bronze and Early Iron Age. We thus observe the presence of hearths and distinct spaces used for food preservation and storage, as well as kitchens. Variations in the architectural forms and the aggregation of living spaces can be interpreted as an expression of fundamental changes in the society. In houses with a single circular or rectangular chamber, the interior dimensions seem to correspond to the residential space for basic families, probably as part of kinship-based society. Houses with several non-connected rooms seem to have been occupied by larger groups, while the houses with a central courtyard and rooms arranged radially, seem to indicate a greater intention to distinguish family groups from the rest of the village population.
978-2-35842-024-2
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/219159
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