Objectives: To evaluate the hypothesis of the impact of BMI and behavioral risk factors on dental caries experience in a cross-sectional study in two different Mexican populations, an urban and a rural.Methods: Adolescents (12 to 15-year-old) living in the urban city of Veracruz (UA) and in a rural town Tepancan (RA) in Mexico were enrolled. Caries status was recorded (ICDAS and DMFS) and Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated (kg/m2) and classified (normal weight/overweight) according to WHO guidelines. Information about oral habits (toothbrushing/dental flossing/dental check-ups) and dietary intake patterns (consumption of sweets) were assessed via interview questionnaire. Data were analyzed (STATA) and a multinomial logistic regression model (MLRM) was run using ICDAS as a dependent variable.Results: A total of 464 subjects participated (UA=224; RA=240). Caries prevalence was higher in UA (42.4%) than in RA (33.7%) (p<0.01). UA had a higher prevalence of enamel lesions compared to RA (63.2% and 36.8%) and a lower prevalence of dentin lesions (22.5% and 77.5%, respectively) (p<0.01). BMI was similar for UA (21.98±3.35) and RA (21.86±2.44). In RA, caries experience (DMFS>0) was statistically higher in overweight subjects (p<0.05). In UA, better oral habits were reported, the association between regular dental-check ups and lower caries experience was significant (p<0.01) and the consumption of sweets was higher (p=0.04). Using the MLRM, the zone (UA or RA) was significantly related to caries severity (p<0.01).Conclusions: Caries was associated to behavioral and geographic situations. Higher caries prevalence was observed in UA despite adequate oral hygiene habits and frequent dental check-ups while higher caries severity was recorded in RA linked to the lack of them. BMI was not different between areas yet overweight was a statistically significant risk factor associated to caries experience in the rural population. Homogeneity in rural areas may reduce misinterpretation on data analysis.

BMI and behavioral factors on caries in Mexican urban/rural populations / Lara Capi, Cynthia; Cocco, Fabio; Lingström, Peter; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Cagetti, Maria Grazia; Campus, Guglielmo. - (2016). ((Intervento presentato al convegno 2016 AADR/CADR Annual Meeting (March 16-19, 2016) (Los Angeles).

BMI and behavioral factors on caries in Mexican urban/rural populations

LARA CAPI, Cynthia;COCCO, Fabio;CAMPUS, Guglielmo Giuseppe
2016

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the hypothesis of the impact of BMI and behavioral risk factors on dental caries experience in a cross-sectional study in two different Mexican populations, an urban and a rural.Methods: Adolescents (12 to 15-year-old) living in the urban city of Veracruz (UA) and in a rural town Tepancan (RA) in Mexico were enrolled. Caries status was recorded (ICDAS and DMFS) and Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated (kg/m2) and classified (normal weight/overweight) according to WHO guidelines. Information about oral habits (toothbrushing/dental flossing/dental check-ups) and dietary intake patterns (consumption of sweets) were assessed via interview questionnaire. Data were analyzed (STATA) and a multinomial logistic regression model (MLRM) was run using ICDAS as a dependent variable.Results: A total of 464 subjects participated (UA=224; RA=240). Caries prevalence was higher in UA (42.4%) than in RA (33.7%) (p<0.01). UA had a higher prevalence of enamel lesions compared to RA (63.2% and 36.8%) and a lower prevalence of dentin lesions (22.5% and 77.5%, respectively) (p<0.01). BMI was similar for UA (21.98±3.35) and RA (21.86±2.44). In RA, caries experience (DMFS>0) was statistically higher in overweight subjects (p<0.05). In UA, better oral habits were reported, the association between regular dental-check ups and lower caries experience was significant (p<0.01) and the consumption of sweets was higher (p=0.04). Using the MLRM, the zone (UA or RA) was significantly related to caries severity (p<0.01).Conclusions: Caries was associated to behavioral and geographic situations. Higher caries prevalence was observed in UA despite adequate oral hygiene habits and frequent dental check-ups while higher caries severity was recorded in RA linked to the lack of them. BMI was not different between areas yet overweight was a statistically significant risk factor associated to caries experience in the rural population. Homogeneity in rural areas may reduce misinterpretation on data analysis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11388/171010
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